Jefferson Union HSD


County
District Type
High School District
Number of Students
4,811 (Includes charter school students)
Number of Schools
6
Urbanicity
Suburban
Student Need
Lowest Need (0 - 39% LCFF unduplicated pupils)
% English Learners
Lower (16 - 25% EL)
Student Socioeconomic
Lowest Poverty (0 - 35% FRPM)
Few Foundations
Partial Foundations
Strong Foundations

For the initial iteration of the DRI, the database only includes LEAs identified as Elementary, Unified, and High
School Districts with 2,500 or more enrolled students. The DRI does not include:

  • Districts with student enrollment under 2,500
  • Charter schools
  • County Offices of Education
  • Private schools
  • Unique Local Educational Agencies (e.g., State Special Schools; Regional Occupation Centers)

Domain: Community

Jefferson Union High has few foundations in family and community engagement.

Districts with Few Foundations in a domain earned fewer than 50% of Indicator points possible.

Domain Ratings:
Few Foundations
Partial Foundations
Strong Foundations

For the initial iteration of the DRI, the database only includes LEAs identified as Elementary, Unified, and High
School Districts with 2,500 or more enrolled students. The DRI does not include:

  • Districts with student enrollment under 2,500
  • Charter schools
  • County Offices of Education
  • Private schools
  • Unique Local Educational Agencies (e.g., State Special Schools; Regional Occupation Centers)
Indicator Scores:
No
Some
Yes

For the initial iteration of the DRI, the database only includes LEAs identified as Elementary, Unified, and High
School Districts with 2,500 or more enrolled students. The DRI does not include:

  • Districts with student enrollment under 2,500
  • Charter schools
  • County Offices of Education
  • Private schools
  • Unique Local Educational Agencies (e.g., State Special Schools; Regional Occupation Centers)

Domain: Financial Management

Jefferson Union High has strong foundations in financial management.

Districts with Strong Foundations in a domain earned 70% or more of Indicator points possible.

Domain Ratings:
Few Foundations
Partial Foundations
Strong Foundations

For the initial iteration of the DRI, the database only includes LEAs identified as Elementary, Unified, and High
School Districts with 2,500 or more enrolled students. The DRI does not include:

  • Districts with student enrollment under 2,500
  • Charter schools
  • County Offices of Education
  • Private schools
  • Unique Local Educational Agencies (e.g., State Special Schools; Regional Occupation Centers)
Indicator Scores:
No
Some
Yes

For the initial iteration of the DRI, the database only includes LEAs identified as Elementary, Unified, and High
School Districts with 2,500 or more enrolled students. The DRI does not include:

  • Districts with student enrollment under 2,500
  • Charter schools
  • County Offices of Education
  • Private schools
  • Unique Local Educational Agencies (e.g., State Special Schools; Regional Occupation Centers)

Domain: Leadership & Governance

Jefferson Union High has strong foundations in leadership and governance.

Districts with Strong Foundations in a domain earned 70% or more of Indicator points possible.

Domain Ratings:
Few Foundations
Partial Foundations
Strong Foundations

For the initial iteration of the DRI, the database only includes LEAs identified as Elementary, Unified, and High
School Districts with 2,500 or more enrolled students. The DRI does not include:

  • Districts with student enrollment under 2,500
  • Charter schools
  • County Offices of Education
  • Private schools
  • Unique Local Educational Agencies (e.g., State Special Schools; Regional Occupation Centers)
Indicator Scores:
No
Some
Yes

For the initial iteration of the DRI, the database only includes LEAs identified as Elementary, Unified, and High
School Districts with 2,500 or more enrolled students. The DRI does not include:

  • Districts with student enrollment under 2,500
  • Charter schools
  • County Offices of Education
  • Private schools
  • Unique Local Educational Agencies (e.g., State Special Schools; Regional Occupation Centers)

Domain: School Personnel

Jefferson Union High has partial foundations in school personnel.

Districts with Partial Foundations in a domain earned between 50% to 69.99% of Indicator points possible.

Domain Ratings:
Few Foundations
Partial Foundations
Strong Foundations

For the initial iteration of the DRI, the database only includes LEAs identified as Elementary, Unified, and High
School Districts with 2,500 or more enrolled students. The DRI does not include:

  • Districts with student enrollment under 2,500
  • Charter schools
  • County Offices of Education
  • Private schools
  • Unique Local Educational Agencies (e.g., State Special Schools; Regional Occupation Centers)
Indicator Scores:
No
Some
Yes

For the initial iteration of the DRI, the database only includes LEAs identified as Elementary, Unified, and High
School Districts with 2,500 or more enrolled students. The DRI does not include:

  • Districts with student enrollment under 2,500
  • Charter schools
  • County Offices of Education
  • Private schools
  • Unique Local Educational Agencies (e.g., State Special Schools; Regional Occupation Centers)

Domain: Work Environment

Jefferson Union High has partial foundations in work environment.

Districts with Partial Foundations in a domain earned between 50% to 69.99% of Indicator points possible.

Domain Ratings:
Few Foundations
Partial Foundations
Strong Foundations

For the initial iteration of the DRI, the database only includes LEAs identified as Elementary, Unified, and High
School Districts with 2,500 or more enrolled students. The DRI does not include:

  • Districts with student enrollment under 2,500
  • Charter schools
  • County Offices of Education
  • Private schools
  • Unique Local Educational Agencies (e.g., State Special Schools; Regional Occupation Centers)
Indicator Scores:
No
Some
Yes

For the initial iteration of the DRI, the database only includes LEAs identified as Elementary, Unified, and High
School Districts with 2,500 or more enrolled students. The DRI does not include:

  • Districts with student enrollment under 2,500
  • Charter schools
  • County Offices of Education
  • Private schools
  • Unique Local Educational Agencies (e.g., State Special Schools; Regional Occupation Centers)

What Can You Do With This Information?

California Collaborative for Educational Excellence

The California Collaborative for Educational Excellence (CCEE) was established by the California State Legislature and Governor to advise and assist school districts, county offices of education, and charter schools (local educational agencies [LEAs] achieve the goals and objectives in their Local Control and Accountability Plans (LCAPs). It was created as part of the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) legislation that redesigned California ‘s school funding formulas to ensure that there would be sufficient support for students who required additional resources to ensure their success.

https://ccee-ca.org/

California School Dashboard

The California School Dashboard provides parents and educators with meaningful information on school and district progress so they can participate in decisions to improve student learning.

https://www.caschooldashboard.org/

Ed-Data

Ed-Data is a partnership of the California Department of Education, EdSource, and the Fiscal Crisis and Management Assistance Team/California School Information Services (FCMAT/CSIS) designed to offer educators, policy makers, the legislature, parents, and the public quick access to timely and comprehensive data about K-12 education in California.

http://www.ed-data.org/

What Can You Do With This Information?

Californians for Justice (CFJ): Student Engagement

CFJ maintains that by seeing young people as experts on their educational experiences we can shift school culture, improve academic outcomes, and develop lifelong community and civic leaders. This starts by ensuring that every student, especially the voices and experiences of low-income students of color, are heard, valued, and reflected in the continuous improvement of their schools.

https://caljustice.org/issues/student-engagement/

Californians for Justice School Funding and LCFF

This resource explains the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF).

https://caljustice.org/issues/school-funding/

Student Voice Continuum: How to Build Student Power

The Student Voice Continuum can allow organizations to see how to level up student voice in their work — building engagement and racial equity as they move toward student governance.

https://caljustice.org/resource/student-voice-continuum-how-to-build-student-power/

What Can You Do With This Information?

PACE Education Finance

PACE research in this area is focused on building and advancing the evidence base on how to achieve equitable and adequate funding that leads to improved outcomes.

https://edpolicyinca.org/topics/education-finance

Ed-Data

Ed-Data has detailed 2021-22 financial data and comparisons for California’s K-12 school districts and county offices of education. The reports, which are unaudited actuals, include data on school district revenues and expenses, the current expense of education calculation, and more. Financial data are available at the school district and state levels only. From any district or county office of education profile, click the financial data tab to see the reports.

https://www.ed-data.org/article/New-on-Ed--Data#finance

School Finance Resources

This page contains resources on school finance produced by the Learning Policy Institute and other research organizations and leading school finance researchers. Additional content will be added as it is published, including a series of reports on school finance currently being developed by the Learning Policy Institute.

https://learningpolicyinstitute.org/school-funding-resources

What Can You Do With This Information?

PACE Educational Governance and Policy

PACE research in this area is designed to support the continued development of systems, and strengthen educational governance at all levels.

https://edpolicyinca.org/topics/educational-governance-policy

CCEE Center for Teaching, Learning, & Leading

The Center for Teaching, Learning, & Leading works in alliance with educators to improve teaching, learning, and leadership so every student is inspired and prepared to thrive as their best self. They do this by advising County Offices of Education and Local Education Agencies, identifying school turnaround principles that effectively build capacity, and building a professional learning infrastructure focused on learning acceleration in Literacy, Mathematics, and Language Development.

https://ccee-ca.org/center-for-teaching-learning-leading/

CCEE Center for Innovation, Instruction, & Impact

The Center for Innovation, Instruction, & Impact seeks and amplifies best practices and resources from educators and schools to collaboratively provide students in California with what they need to thrive. They do this by designing and implementing strategies and initiatives to share lessons learned from their work and emerging/best practices from the field to support sustained improvement for students, collecting and analyzing internal programs and statewide data to measure student outcomes and impact of instructional supports, and developing structures for identifying and developing professional learning resources.

https://ccee-ca.org/center-for-innovation-instruction-impact/

What Can You Do With This Information?

NCTQ Retention and Tenure

School districts need to keep their effective teachers. Better pay certainly helps and so does providing more career advancement opportunities that allow teachers to stay in the classroom. The first step is to cultivate a school environment that values excellence and where great teachers can thrive as they work alongside each other.

https://www.nctq.org/policy-area/Retention-and-Tenure

NCTQ Teacher Prep Review

The NCTQ Teacher Prep Review evaluates the quality of programs that provide preservice preparation of teachers. The Review database includes both traditional and non-traditional programs.

https://www.nctq.org/review/home

NCTQ Principal Evaluation and Observation

The NCTQ State Teacher Policy Database provides access to information on state policies, laws, and regulations that impact teacher quality — ranging from teacher preparation, licensing, and evaluation to compensation, teacher diversity, and hiring and assignment. The NCTQ examines the principal evaluation policies across all states.

https://www.nctq.org/yearbook/national/Principal-Evaluation-and-Observation-95

What Can You Do With This Information?

CA Labor Management Initiative

Since its launch in 2015, the California Labor Management Initiative (CA LMI) has sought to make collaboration between labor and management an integral part of the continuous improvement of public schools in California. The CA LMI works with a strong coalition that includes the California Department of Education, the Association of California School Administrators, the California Federation of Teachers, the California School Boards Association, the California School Employees Association, the California Teachers Association, the California County Superintendents Educational Services Association, the California Collaborative for Educational Excellence, and numerous school districts statewide.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1RqUaih3XDhRvgbsJneqSwAmadQaKfYtl/view

California Teachers Association

The California Teachers Association exists to protect and promote the well-being of its members; to improve the conditions of teaching and learning; to advance the cause of free, universal, and quality public education for all students; to ensure that the human dignity and civil rights of all children, youth, and adults are protected; and to secure a more just, equitable, and democratic society.

https://www.cta.org/for-educators/meet-cta/esp

California Teachers Association: Your Rights

CTA members have the legal right to a safe and healthy workplace. These resources help one understand, preserve, and enhance rights.

https://www.cta.org/for-educators/your-rights

Posts a recent budget to its website

In 2020-21, Jefferson Union High School District posted a district budget on their website. Across the DRI sample, about 77% of school districts published a district budget on their website. No school districts were coded as missing data in the DRI sample.

Research and experience show that greater family and community engagement in their local education in part requires access to information about their school district’s practices and policies (Mapp & Kuttner, 2014). Although Parental Involvement is a statewide educational priority area, Local Education Agencies often do not provide adequate or equitable support for parents to access, interpret, and engage with this information (Cottingham, 2020). Posting adopted budgets online is one important way that local educators can share information with the community to encourage participation in decision-making processes.

Readiness to develop relationships with families

In 2018-19, Jefferson Union High School District reported reported in the LCFF survey they were in the exploration or research phase, or beginning development of “developing the capacity of staff (i.e. administrators, teachers, and classified staff) to build trusting and respectful relationships with families.” Across the DRI sample, about 58% of school districts reported they were in full or sustaining implementation of developing the capacity of staff to build trusting and respectful relationships with families. About 1% of school districts did not include responses to the LCFF survey.

Research and experience show that educators can play an important role in laying the groundwork for trusting and respectful relationships with the families they serve (Auerbach, 2010; Ishimaru, 2013). These kinds of relationships can help educators replace deficit approaches to families’ capacities (Baquedano-Lopez et al., 2013) with a view that values the assets they bring to their children’s education (Mapp & Kuttner, 2014).

Family and community involvement in decision-making

In 2018-19, Jefferson Union High School District reported in the LCFF survey they were in the exploration or research phase, or beginning development  of “providing opportunities to have families, teachers, principals, and district administrators work together to plan, design, implement and evaluate family engagement activities at school and district levels.” Across the DRI sample, about 49% of school districts reported they were in “full implementation” or “sustaining implementation” of engaging families, teachers, principals, and district administrators in family engagement activities. About 1% of school districts did not include responses to the LCFF survey.

Research and experience show that opportunities for collaborative decision-making between educators, families, and the community is a critical aspect of developing and strengthening relationships (Ishimaru, 2019) and promoting greater involvement in local educational affairs (Ishimaru, 2014; Marsh & Hall, 2018).

Created a student member seat on its board of education

In 2020-21, Jefferson Union High School District had a policy that created a student member seat on their board of education. Across the DRI sample, researchers found evidence on district websites that about 43% of school districts had adopted policies that created a seat for student members on their board of education. About 34% of school districts were not required to include a student member on their board of education.

Research and experience show that an important first step in including students in a school district’s reform process is to give students the right to speak for themselves about their educational experiences, and the opportunity to be heard by those in places of power (Feuer & Mayer, 2009). California Education Code (section 35012) states that at school districts where there are one or more high schools, students may submit a petition to the Board of Education requesting that they appoint one or more student members to the board.

Publishes a translated Budget Overview for Parents

Data for this indicator was not available or could not be located for this district. Scores are calculated using the total number of points possible based on data availability, so the district is not penalized for missing information. Learn more about our methodology here.

Opportunities for two-way communication with families

In 2018-19, Jefferson Union High School District reported in the LCFF survey they were in the exploration or research phase, or beginning development of “developing multiple opportunities for the LEA and school sites to engage in 2-way communication between families and educators using language that is understandable and accessible to families.” Across the DRI sample, about 64% of school districts reported they were in full or sustaining implementation of developing multiple opportunities for accessible and understandable two-way communication between families and educators. About 1% of school districts did not include responses to the LCFF survey.

Research and experience show that a key barrier to greater engagement with families and communities is untranslated and difficult to understand language (Marsh 2007; Marsh et al. 2015). Moreover, families’ competing obligations require varied entry points for communicating with educators (Posey-Maddox & Haley-Lock, 2016). When educators and families regularly communicate with each other, they can better understand each other’s needs to support students (Baker et al., 2016).

Enrollments declined less than the average DRI school district over the last 10 years.

Between SY 2020-11 and 2020-21, Jefferson Union High School District’s enrollments changed by -5.1%. Therefore, Jefferson Union High School District enrollments changed similar to the DRI’s average school district. On average across the DRI sample, school district enrollments fell by 3.5%. Five percent of school districts were missing this information.

Research and experience show that declines in enrollments force school districts to try to quickly scale-down services with fewer on-hand resources to varying degrees of success, often precipitating financial strain (Warren & Lafortune, 2020).

No negative budget certifications in the last five years

From SY 2015-16 to 2020-21, Jefferson Union High School District received 0 negative budget certifications from the Fiscal Crisis Management and Assistance Team. Across the DRI sample, 98% of districts did not receive a single negative budget certification. No school districts were missing this information.

Research and experience show that an important predictor of future financial uncertainty is prior financial concern (EdSource/School Services of California, 2006). As the California Department of Education explains, “a negative certification is assigned [to a district’s budget] when a district will be unable to meet its financial obligations for the remainder of the current year or for the subsequent fiscal year” based on current projections. Districts with such dire financial predictions will likely need to significantly cut expenditures, preventing them from investing in innovative solutions (Burns et al., 2016).

Spends a smaller share of the budget than the average DRI school district on benefits.

As of SY 2018-19, Jefferson Union High School District spent 21.2% on benefits for employees and retirees. Jefferson Union High School District spent about the same as the state’s average school district’s budget share on employees’ and retirees’ benefits. Across the DRI sample, school districts on average spent 22% of their budgets on benefits. Two percent of school districts in the DRI sample were missing this information.

Research and experience show that disproportionate spending on benefits can direct a district’s finite resources away from direct classroom spending (Marchitello et al., 2018). Although districts’ pension contributions are fixed by the state, districts typically have greater say over how to spend on other benefits, like healthcare benefits. Spending a relatively small share of the district’s budget on benefits can create flexibility in funding for additional programs.

Spends a smaller share of the budget than the average DRI school district on its central office.

As of SY 2018-19, Jefferson Union High School District spent 6.3% on benefits for employees and retirees. Jefferson Union High School District spent about the same as the state’s average school district on the central office. Across the DRI sample, school districts spent on average 6% of their budgets on the central office. Less than 1% of school districts were missing this information.

Research and experience show that although the share of central office expenditures often vary by district size and accounting practices (Legislative Analyst’s Office, 2011), educators and advocates tend to look towards–and have more flexibility in–reducing spending on central district office expenditures to manage local finances. This is an especially fertile area for fiscal management after the number of central office administrators has grown significantly over the last two decades (Stoll, 2020).

One or fewer qualified budget certifications in the last five years

From SY 2015-16 to 2020-21, Jefferson Union High School District received 0 qualified budget certifications from the Fiscal Crisis Management and Assistance Team. Across the DRI sample, 87% of districts received one or fewer qualified budget certifications. No school districts were missing this information.

Research and experience show that an important predictor of future financial uncertainty is prior financial concern (EdSource/School Services of California, 2006). As the California Department of Education explains, “a qualified certification is assigned [for a district’s budget] when the district may not meet its financial obligations for the current or two subsequent fiscal years” based on current projections. When districts predict they may not be able to meet their financial obligations, they may need to make financial adjustments and will likely have less flexibility to invest in innovative solutions (Burns et al., 2016).

Maintains financial reserves

Data for this indicator was not available or could not be located for this district. Scores are calculated using the total number of points possible based on data availability, so the district is not penalized for missing information. Learn more about our methodology here.

Caps employees’ and retirees’ healthcare benefits spending

Data for this indicator was not available or could not be located for this district. Scores are calculated using the total number of points possible based on data availability, so the district is not penalized for missing information. Learn more about our methodology here.

Does not cover retirees’ lifetime health benefits

As of SY 2020-21, Jefferson Union High School District does not cover retirees’ benefits for life. Across the DRI sample, 78% of districts did not cover retirees’ benefits for life. Eleven percent of districts were missing this information.

Research and experience show that as aging cohorts of retirees’ healthcare costs increase, school districts can struggle to meet “substantial long-term debt commitments” like promised benefits alongside their current costs (FCMAT, 2004; Melnicoe et al., 2019; Perry et al., 2007). These obligations often limit the amount of money available for innovative programs that can sustain improvements in educational outcomes.

Bonus: Board of education adopted an equity policy

As of SY 2020-21, Jefferson Union High School District’s board of education has adopted an equity policy that promises to meet students’ unique educational needs. Across the DRI sample, 42% of districts have adopted a school board equity policy. No school districts were missing this information.

Research and experience show that equity policies are a useful marker of a school district’s commitment to closing historic opportunity gaps. Equity policies are associated with improved overall student outcomes and reducing some student groups’ test score gaps, like between Hispanic and white students (Kim, 2020). However, equity policies are relatively recent additions to school board practices and they may not have specific accountability mechanisms tied to them that encourage particular practices or systems that support students.

Although formal commitments to educational equity are important, their often symbolic use meant that this indicator was included as a “bonus” for participating districts; that is, districts where their school board adopted equity policies but districts that did not adopt equity policies were not penalized.

Adopted a superintendent performance review policy

As of SY 2020-21, Jefferson Union High School District has adopted a policy to regularly evaluate superintendent performance. Across the DRI sample, 85% of school districts have adopted a superintendent evaluation policy. No school districts were missing this information.

Research and experience show that school boards of education often conduct relatively informal, subjective evaluations that do little for promoting the superintendent’s personal and the local educational system’s growth (DiPaola, 2007). When school boards adopt clear policies guiding their end-of-year evaluation of superintendents, they are in a better position to more objectively evaluate their leadership’s progress towards their shared educational mission.

No attempted or successful school board recalls in the last five years

Between 2016 and 2022, Jefferson Union High School District did not face at least one effort to recall a board of education member. Across the DRI sample, 90% of districts did not face a single attempted or successful effort to recall a member of the district’s board of education. No school districts were missing this information.

Research and experience show that school boards of education that face attempted or successful school board recalls are more likely to face disruptions that forestall efforts to focus on a shared mission, especially in an era of political polarization (Ramanthan, 2022).

Two or fewer superintendents between SY 2012-13 and 2018-19

Between SY 2012-13 and 2018-19, Jefferson Union High School District seated 4 full-time or interim superintendents. Nationally, the average superintendent stays in their school district for about 3.5 years. Compared to this national average, Jefferson Union High School District seated more superintendents than one would expect over this period. Across the DRI sample, no school districts were missing this information.

Research and experience show that although superintendents may not have especially strong direct impacts on student achievement, (Myers, 2011; Chingos et al., 2014) they play an important role in setting an agenda for education (Alsbury, 2008). Districts that predominantly serve historically disadvantaged student groups that yield exceptionally high student performance are especially likely to benefit from stable leadership (Burns et al., 2019).

For the initial iteration of the DRI, the database only includes LEAs identified as Elementary, Unified, and High
School Districts with 2,500 or more enrolled students. The DRI does not include:

  • Districts with student enrollment under 2,500
  • Charter schools
  • County Offices of Education
  • Private schools
  • Unique Local Educational Agencies (e.g., State Special Schools; Regional Occupation Centers)

Employs 95% or more teachers with full credentials

As of SY 2018-19 93.1% of Jefferson Union High School District’s teachers were fully credentialed. Across the DRI sample, no school districts were missing this information. In the state’s average school district, 95% of teachers were fully credentialed. Compared to the state’s average school district, Jefferson Union High School District employed a similar share of teachers that were fully credentialed.

Research and experience show that districts in which students outperformed their peers employ fewer teachers on substandard credentials and permits than the state average (Carver-Thomas et al., 2020). These impacts are especially felt by African American and Latinx students who often are systematically taught by teachers with the weakest credentials (Carver-Thomas et al., 2020). Ensuring classrooms are taught by fully-credentialed staff is an important baseline for executing a shared educational program.

Teacher composition is similar to student composition

As of SY 2018-19 Jefferson Union High School District Diverse Representation Index score was 39.7. This measure compares the composition of its teachers to its students, with 0 representing absolute dissimilarity between teachers and students and 100 representing identical composition of teachers and students. Across the DRI sample, no school districts were missing this information.

Research and experience show that teachers who serve student bodies with shared backgrounds may be especially equipped to understand and meet these students’ needs. Specifically, Black and Hispanic students benefit from attending schools with teachers who look like them (Lindsay & Hart 2017; Meier & Stewart 1992; Pitts 2007). If teachers better understand and are able to meet their unique student bodies’ needs, school districts may be especially effective at implementing and scaling innovative programs and sustaining improvements.

Employs 90% or more teachers with three or more years teaching experience

As of SY 2018-19 85.4% of Jefferson Union High School District’s teachers were experienced (3+ years teaching). Across the DRI sample, no school districts were missing this information. In the state’s average school district, 88% of teachers were experienced. Compared to the state’s average school district, Jefferson Union High School District employed a similar share of teachers that were experienced.

Research and experience show that students, especially African American and Hispanic (Podolsky et al. 2019), gain more from a substantially experienced teacher workforce (Carver-Thomas et. al, 2020). Moreover, additional experienced teachers tend to benefit not just their classrooms but the school as a whole (Kini & Podolsky, 2016) as teachers support one another to improve practice.

Inexperienced teachers are not concentrated in high-need schools

As of SY 2018-19, Jefferson Union High School District’s inexperienced teachers (2 or fewer years experience; Learning Policy Institute, 2019) were less concentrated in the district’s highest needs schools. Across the DRI sample, about 4% of school districts were missing this information.

Research and experience show that difficult-to-staff schools are typically staffed by a greater share of inexperienced teachers (Sutcher et al., 2019). Teachers with less classroom experience are less likely to have important skills to teach students. Because these teachers are often concentrated in schools with greater shares of low-income students and Black and Latino students, inaccessibility to experienced teachers can widen achievement gaps (Peske & Haycock, 2006). When school districts equitably distribute experienced teachers to their high-need schools, they help ensure students receive the support they need to succeed.

Uncredentialed teachers are not concentrated in high-need schools

As of SY 2018-19, Jefferson Union High School District’s teachers without a full credential (Learning Policy Institute, 2019) were less concentrated in the district’s highest needs schools. Across the DRI sample, about 4% of school districts were missing this information.

Research and experience show that teachers with less than full credentials are not equitably distributed throughout the state’s schools and are typically concentrated in urban areas with large shares of low-income, and African American and Hispanic students (Darling-Hammond, 2004). These students’ outcomes are especially harmed when taught by teachers who do not receive important training for skills acquired through a credentialing program (Podolsky et al., 2019). When school districts do not concentrate their teachers with less than full credentials in schools with lots of high–needs students, they help promote a smoother rollout of programs that can support educational improvements.

To learn more about this indicator’s importance and how researchers collected this information, please visit the Methodology page [URL link to specific area in Methodology].

Teacher turnover rate is lower than the national average

Between SY 2017-18 and 2018-19 18.1% of Jefferson Union High School District’s teachers left their schools. Across the DRI sample, about 0.5% of school districts were missing this information. In the state’s average school district, 13% of teachers left their schools. Nationally, about 16% of teachers leave their schools annually. Jefferson Union High School District’s teacher attrition rate was similar to the national average.

Research and experience show that a high turnover in grades and schools is associated with lower student achievement and additional costs (Ronfeldt et al., 2013). Teacher shortages have long been a concern for ensuring adequate and equitable education that COVID-19 has exacerbated (Balow, 2021). A stable body of teachers should therefore mean that teachers feel valued by their leadership and are dedicated to their shared educational mission (Podolsky et al., 2019).

Principal retention rate greater than or equal to the national average

Between SY 2017-18 and 2018-19 66.7% of Jefferson Union High School District’s principals stayed at their schools. Across the DRI sample, about 2% of school districts were missing this information. In the state’s average school district, 68% of principals stayed at their schools. Nationally, about 78% of principals stayed at their schools annually. Jefferson Union High School District’s principal retention rate was similar to the national average.

Research and experience show that principals play an important role in rolling out educational programs (Gates et al., 2019). Their turnover is often associated with significant declines in student achievement for at least two years after they leave their school (Miller, 2013). Conversely, principals who stay at their schools each year can apply their leadership skills on guiding their staff towards fulfilling their shared mission (Grissom et al., 2021).

Offers contract bonus for special assignments or certifications

In 2019-20, Jefferson Union High School District did not offer contract bonuses for teachers employed in special assignments or with special certifications. Special assignments included Special Education and Bilingual classrooms. Special certifications included National Board Certification. Across the DRI sample, about 57% of school districts offered a compensation bonus for at least one special assignment or certification. About 11% of school districts were missing this information.

Research and experience show that financial incentives can be seen as a goodwill investment in recruiting teachers for hard-to-staff subjects like Special Education (Putnam & Gerber, 2022) and Bilingual assignments (Nittler, 2017) and with special qualifications like National Board Certification (Kelley & Kimball, 2001; Goldhaber & Anthony, 2007).

One or fewer formal impasses declared involving teacher’s union

Between 2016 and 2021, Jefferson Union High School District faced 0 formal declarations of an impasse between the teacher’s union and administrators. Across the DRI sample, no school districts were missing this information.

Research and experience show that although the most intense labor-management disagreements come to a head in a formal work stoppage or strike, these rarely occur in California education (US Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2021). However, labor-management disagreements can be expressed in other lower-stakes ways like filing formal bargaining impasses to the statewide labor relations board. Such disagreements may inhibit educators from pursuing their shared mission of educating students.

Bonus: Participated in Labor Management Initiative

Data for this indicator was not available or could not be located for this district. Scores are calculated using the total number of points possible based on data availability, so the district is not penalized for missing information. Learn more about our methodology here.

In 2019-20, Jefferson Union High School District provided mid-point salaries below the average midpoint salaries of districts of the same type that served similar numbers of students. Across the DRI sample, about 48% of school districts provided mid-point salaries above similar districts’ average midpoint salaries. About 4% of school districts were missing this information.

Research and experience show that an important way school districts can recruit teachers for long-term employment is by offering higher later-career salaries (Gritz & Theobald, 1996; Lin, 2010). Such compensation can encourage retention in school districts (Reed et al., 2006) to continue work towards a shared educational mission that yields strong student results (Dolton & Marcenarro-Gutierrez, 2011).

Signed a Distance Learning Memorandum of Understanding within thirty days of SY 2020-21 start

Data for this indicator was not available or could not be located for this district. Scores are calculated using the total number of points possible based on data availability, so the district is not penalized for missing information. Learn more about our methodology here.
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